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007: John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman, ‘My One and Only Love’

Posted by jeff on Dec 24, 2009 in Jazz, Song Of the week, Vocalists

John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman

Oh, am I excited!

A new CD was released last week by my favoritest ‘singer’ – “Dedicated to You: Kurt Elling Sings the Music of Coltrane and Hartman“. So I’m just popping with anticipation.
Kurt Elling is 42, from Chicago, and this is his 8th CD in 14 years. It’s a re-recording (with a few tasteful additions) of the 1963 classic “John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman”. Mr. Elling is an artist of amazing versatility, not just a singer. But he’s also a great crooner, as this CD will undoubtedly prove–when I manage to get my hands on it, here in the wholly holey Holy Land. But in the meantime, let’s revisit the source.

John Coltrane is a monumental figure in modern jazz. He started out as an untried, technically limited tenor saxophonist in Miles Davis’ first quintet in the mid-50s. Eventually Miles had to throw him out of the band for drug abuse. Then he cut his chops for a while with Thelonious Monk and got himself off drugs. Then he rejoined Miles in the late 50s for the “Kind of Blue” period, then went solo. In 1961 he started moving towards spiritual, ‘free’ jazz, developing a commercially disastrous technique of “sheets of sound” and a lot of the most astounding music in jazz ever. To appease the record company, he recorded a couple of more palatable LPs, including an eponymous 1963 collaboration with balladeer Johnny Hartman.

Ballads are to Coltrane as political protest songs are to Dylan–they constitute the backbone of his popular reputation, while actually constituting a rather insignificant place in his corpus. In subsequent years, Trane’s playing became so intense and his development as an artist so rapid that enthusiasts track his growth by the month, even by the week. He died in 1967 at the age of 40.

Johnny Hartman had a respectable though not brilliant career as a crooner contemporaneously with and then beyond Coltrane. His voice is so smooth it makes Billy Eckstine sound like Mick Jagger, Nat Cole like Joe Cocker. He recorded sporadically, and his acknowledged masterpiece is their joint venture, “John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman”. Only 30 minutes long, it’s enough of a classic to warrant an homage by as fine an artist as Kurt Elling.

Of the six songs on the LP, each one a gem, I’ve chosen the lovely standard ‘My One and Only Love’. The performance here is the epitome of elegance and warmth, yet intelligent and musically substantial. So lower the lights, put on your smoking jacket, take a brandy glass in your hand, and enjoy.

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005: Glenn Gould, Toccata in Cm (J.S. Bach)

Posted by jeff on Dec 23, 2009 in Classical, Song Of the week

Gould-Toccata in C minor BWV 911

After last week’s visit to The Beach Boys, it’s now the turn of another of the great B’s, J.S. Bach, for a piece from a rather obscure work of his, the Toccatas for keyboard (BWV 910-916).

Most of Bach’s works for solo instruments are composed of six units. These toccatas are seven, and they’re not widely performed. Two good reasons why they’re a favorite of mine. Oh, and the fact that they’re so great.

(BTW, don’t confuse these obscure keyboard toccatas with the famous Toccata and Fugue in D Minor BWV 565 for organ, which some of you may know through Garth Hudson’s expansive introduction to The Band’s ‘Chest Fever’, especially in concert versions).

I always think of these toccatas as Old Jack Bach’s jazz pieces, because of their very improvisatory feel, meandering from section to section, no rigorous structure. In the one we’re featuring here, BWV 911 in C minor, he starts out with a doodle, then seems to find a bit of a melodic groove with a counterpoint, then seems to lose interest and return to his doodling, then a pause where he seems so be wondering what to do next. And then he rrrrrrrrips into a mad, take-no-prisoners fugue, one of the longest he ever wrote, 4 pages in the score. Then he starts to unwind it, slow it down. You think the race is over, and – boom, right back to the whirlwind. Then a playful, elegant elaboration, with the main theme alternating between minor and major. Right on, Johann.

Serious musicians enjoy arguing about whether to perform Jack’s keyboard oeuvre on the clavichord or harpsichord (the keyboards of his day), or its well-tempered successor, the pianoforte, aka the piano.

I have a hard time getting all twisted up about that (gee, could that possibly mean that I’m not serious?). I go for the particular performance. And for me, almost every time, that’s Glenn Gould.

In a Social Skills school, Gould would be placed in a class with Howard Hughes and Bobby Fischer. You might not want to go on a camping trip with him. Serious musicians (them again) have a lot of reservations about him—he hums along with his playing (okay, not a great attraction), and his interpretations are ‘willful’ (i.e., eccentric, off-the-wall, wacko). He doesn’t adhere to the traditional tempi. Oy.

I have a problem with a lot of the performing arts, such as acting and classical music. So often, the performer performs the score—plays the notes, reads the lines—rather than portraying a living version of what underlies it. And it all goes right past my ear. I loved hearing John Barton, the legendary founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, say that he can rarely hear Shakespearean actors, that it’s usually just ‘words, words, words’ that fly past him. What I (and I think he) need is 100%, full-time, total engagément. Play no note, speak no line, dance no step, until you understand why it has to be. That kind of intensity is crazy. That’s why I listen to Glenn Gould.

And I find his performance here wild and wonderful, full of humor and passion and humanity, and I’m tickled to have the opportunity to share it with you.

More SoTW posts on J.S. Bach:

077: J.S. Bach, ‘The Art of The Fugue’ (The Emerson Quartet, ‘Contrapunctus 9′)

084: Dmitri Shostakovich, Prelude & Fugue No 16 in B-flat Minor (Tatiana Nikolaeva)

113: J.S. Bach, ‘Prelude to Suite #2 for Unaccompanied Cello’ (Casals)

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003: Garcia/Grisman, ‘So What’

Posted by jeff on Dec 21, 2009 in New Acoustic, Song Of the week

Garcia-Grisman–So What

Miles Davis — So What

‘Crossover’ is a turnoff for me. I go for the unadulterated. Single malt whiskey.  Kurosawa’s “Hidden Fortress” rather than “Star Wars”. Beowulf in the original Old English. Just kidding about that one.

But I do like sharing music that I’m just in the process of discovering, the stuff that’s running around my mind when I wake up in the middle of the night. So this week it’s ‘So What’, written by Miles Davis as performed by Jerry Garcia & David Grisman from the CD of the same name.

It’s a classic jazz piece played by a great rock guitarist joining forces with an ex-bluegrass mandolinist, and they’ve managed to forge a singularly charming little gem.

Jerry Garcia (zt”l) led the Grateful Dead—an eclectic rock jam band and cultural phenomenon. (He was also a prince of a guy. I had the distinct honor of helping host him and the Dead for a weekend.) He eventually branched out into various country & western, bluegrass, ‘new acoustic’ directions.

©Jon Sievert

David Grisman worked mostly in the ‘newgrass‘ context. That means music with bluegrass instrumentation and texture, but fueled by progressive, jazz-minded improvisation. Bela Fleck is the acknowledged Main Man there. Grisman, with Andy Statman, has even ventured as far afield as newgrass klezmer.

Garcia/Grisman made a bunch of CDs together (here are some samples from “Been All Around This World“, “Not Only for Kids“, “Old and In the Way“, “Shady Grove“, eponymous, and a bunch more with Tony Rice called “The Pizza Tapes“. Our SoTW is one of three versions of the title tune of the CD “So What“, recorded 1992. It’s their jazz CD, including 3 pieces associated with Miles and one original.

‘So What’ is the opening cut of Miles Davis’s 1959 “Kind of Blue”. It’s a unique album. Everyone loves and admires it. Non-jazz people. MORers. Aficionados of elevator music. Effete jazz snobs (although I don’t know any of them personally). Critics. Even Deadheads, turns out. Poll any jazzist about the great jazz albums of all time, chances are it’ll be #1– unanimously. More of an icon in jazz than the ‘underwritten and overproduced’ Sgt Pepper in rock. It’s really that good. Miles read a theoretical work about modal scales, recruited the young (white) pianist Bill Evans into his black band which included John Coltrane, scheduled ‘just another session’, and a monolith was created.

The cut here isn’t life-changing music, but it sure is sweet and smile-provoking. Heck, it’s even got vocal percussion.

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy:
070: Buddy Holly, ‘That’ll Be the Day’
079: Miles Davis, ‘So What’ (“Kind of Blue”)
092: Béla Fleck, Edgar Meyer, Zakir Hussain, ‘Babar’ (“The Melody of Rhythm”)

 

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001: Mint Juleps, ‘Don’t Let Your Heart’

Posted by jeff on Dec 19, 2009 in A Cappella, Song Of the week

Let’s start with a bang.

Mint Juleps, ‘Don’t Let Your Heart’.

Interesting how there’s such a great dance groove, even though there’s no percussion (other than the finger-snapping) for the first 2/3 of the song, and no bass part whatsoever! Am I going to become extraneous? Lovely interplay between the lead, the ‘too-too-too’ arpeggio (my favorite part of the arrangement) and the choral blocks. The group has only about 2 CDs worth of material (1985, 1996). There are a couple of fun Motown chick covers (‘Jimmy Mack’, ‘Da Doo Run Run’) a cappella, and a fully produced version of Neil Young’s ‘Only Love Can Break Your Heart’ that I like a lot. But ‘Don’t Let Your Heart’ is the memorable cut.

This song was included in a 1990 PBS TV show, Spike Lee & Co: Do It A Cappella.

I apologize to the members of this list to whom I already sent this song a couple of weeks ago. What can you do? I still can’t get it out of my head. I’m reading Oliver Sachs’ Musicophilia. On p. 309 he quotes Irving J. Massey: “[In contrast with action, character, visual elements and language,] music in dreams is the same as music in our waking life….One might say that music never sleeps…It is as if it were an autonomous system, indifferent to our consciousness or lack of it.”

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